Posts Tagged ‘qualitative’

Change is the New Normal: Insights from the 2018 QRCA Conference

Posted on: February 2nd, 2018 by doyle

From the desk of Kathy Doyle

IF you are a qualitative researcher and have not attended a QRCA Conference, you owe it to yourself to add it to your list.  QRCA members are hands down the most generous, forward-thinking and collegial people you will ever meet, and the conference itself is unlike any other.

As usual, this year’s conference was full of educational and inspirational sessions, great exhibitors, and some excellent and thought-provoking roundtable discussions.

Here is a recap of my key takeaways:

  1. Social media and AI technology are rapidly becoming the next generation tool for qualitative recruiting and data collection. Shapiro & Raj discussed their social adaptive recruiting, which accesses forums, online communities, and public social networks to “find the hard-to-find”; and Tory Gentes discussed some decidedly non-traditional techniques for using tools in our socially connected world (some sites this Boomer had never heard of before!) as a means to find quality recruits.
  2. Virtual Reality (VR) and Augmented Reality (AR) are poised to explode as a qualitative tool. David Bauer, of Hemisphere Insights, led a great session on this topic.  As home VR equipment becomes ubiquitous, and programming costs are reduced, the ability to create more engaging experiences will become a reality.    Use VR/AR to test concepts in-home; to simulate an in-store shopping experience; to create truly engaging virtual ethnography; to facilitate co-creation; and to allow stakeholders to understand the customer experience in a way not possible before.
  3. The traditional qualitative report is slowly but surely going the way of the dinosaur. The momentum continues to grow for shorter, more visual,  non-traditional reports that tell a story that can persuade and influence decision making.  While PPT is still most common, reports may also take the form of podcasts, photo books, full video reports, magazine reports, talk shows, or any number of other creative deliverables.
  4. The line between qualitative and quantitative is continuing to blur. Any survey can now be combined with qualitative feedback via video open-ends or qualitative “pull outs” –where a select number of respondents (based on their survey responses) are asked to participate in follow up qualitative interviews, to expand upon the learning from the survey and address the “why’s” behind their responses.  Where once qualitative and quantitative were distinctly different beasts, hybrid projects are becoming increasingly common.

It’s an exciting time to be in the market research industry.   Hold on, and enjoy the ride!

“This is a new year. A new beginning. And things will change.” 
― Taylor Swift

“The pace of change and the threat of disruption creates tremendous opportunities…” 
Steve Case

Five Key Factors That Impact Qualitative Costs

Posted on: December 18th, 2017 by doyle

From the desk of Kathy Doyle

When you ask your qualitative partners to provide a cost estimate for your research project, do you know what the key factors are that impact the price they provide? Knowing that information could help you save money, avoid surprises, and provide you with a better idea of how to evaluate competing bids.

In any qualitative bid, there are five key factors that impact price:

1. Screening criteria: The more difficult the screening criteria, and the more questions that need to be asked of respondents during the screening process (which impacts cooperation rates) the greater the cost. For that reason, focus on the “need to know” questions, such as key demographics/psychographics, and category/brand usage. “Nice to know” information can be covered in the research.

2. Size of the recruit: The more participants you recruit, the greater the cost. Because qualitative is designed to provide direction rather than to be projectable to a larger population, be conservative with your sample size. Tip: don’t forget to account for last minute cancellations, no shows and respondents who don’t pass a re-screen. We recommend over-recruiting by 20% to ensure that you end up with the number of respondents requested. When comparing bids, make sure to ask whether the cost estimate includes the cost for over-recruits.

3. Incentives: There are three things that influence how much respondents are paid: the difficulty of the recruit, the location of the research, and the amount of work a respondent is being asked to do. The difficulty of the recruit goes without saying: the harder it is to find respondents (very low incidence, consumers vs. professionals), the more you need to pay to make sure they agree to participate. And if your research is being conducted digitally vs. in-person, incentives will most likely be lower because respondents are able to participate from the convenience of their home or office. Finally, the more you ask respondents to do, the greater the incentive. Do you need them for 30-minutes, 2 hours, 2 weeks? Be realistic about how much time you need to accomplish your research objectives, so that you are not paying more in incentives than is necessary.

4. Facility Rental or Platform License Fees: Time is king. The more time you spend in a facility, or licensing a technology platform, the greater the cost. Know how much time you’ll need to accomplish your goals, and set the length of the research sessions accordingly. Padding, because you haven’t adequately scoped out the research, can cost you. And conversely, not allowing enough time can shortchange results.

5. Deliverables: The type of deliverable required can dramatically impact your costs, easily increasing professional fees by 50% or more. Do you need a detailed report, an executive summary, or just a post-research debriefing session? A multi-media PPT presentation, or a professionally edited video report? Be realistic: contract only for what you know your team will use.

Armed with this information, you can be confident that you have designed your research to maximize results and minimize costs.

I SPY WITH MY LITTLE EYE…8 easy ways to get closer to your customer on a tiny budget, or less!

Posted on: October 2nd, 2017 by doyle

 

From the desk of Carole Schmidt

Steve Jobs famously quipped: “Get closer than ever to your customers. So close that you tell them what they need, well before they realize it themselves.”  

We understand that budgets are tight and time is pressured. When full research projects aren’t in the mix, here are 8 underutilized ways to engage with your customer for depth and breadth and possibly your next “big idea”:

  1. Do the CX “presearch”/ Observe your customer in situ, where decisions are made. Get out of the office. Ask 3 customers if you can shadow them for one morning each. Whether it’s a business customer who owns a busy distribution center, or a single dad juggling his job, the kids, the shopping and the transport for his husband, or a construction worker on the site, most people are happy to have you walk in their shoes if you just ask. Take pictures. Take notes. Pin them up in front of you.
  2. Check the mail / Read unsolicited customer emails, letters, contact comments. There is a wealth of product or service refinement opportunities over in the PR department, underutilized by insights teams. Tap into this rich resource. Then move it to your department. Then post it on your walls.
  3. Explore the buzz / Conduct qualitative social media analysis of your customers’ category, brands, competitors to see what’s being said behind the trendlines. It’s not expensive, and there’s likely to be a trove of fodder there. (See http://doyleresearch.com/digging-behind-social-media-trendlines-matters/)
  4. See it to believe it / Ask for customer-generated video: Everyone’s carrying a smartphone these days, making your customers’ experience—including those small annoyances or pesky tasks–easier than ever to capture in the moment. Ask your customers to do a 30-second video about…insert topic (complaint, excitement, process need, etc.)…and have them send it to you. Today. Then watch it. Have 20+ of those? We’ll watch them and tell you what they mean and what you might do about it!
  5. What you already know may help you—again! / Discover new insights from old research using Meta Analysis! If you have research reports less than two years old, get some coffee and settle in to read them again, cover to cover. Have dozens? We’ll help you tap your customer’s voice by reviewing your existing research with fresh eyes and a different objective, so you get more out of the research dollars you’re already spending. Bosses love the efficiency, and you will love the “aha’s” buried inside.
  6. Become your competitors’ good customer. / Conduct the intelligence for smarter business decisions. Eat their pizza. Install their app. Test drive or rent their cars. Open an account at their online store. Understanding your competitors’ CX instantly makes you sharper about what distinction and benefits you should be promoting, and what refinements you should be considering.
  7. Ask for specifics. / Pay for more open ends and analysis on your customer satisfaction surveys. Then personally read the responses so you can hear the ideas, but also gauge the more subtle tone and feel and particular language your customer uses.
  8. Invite ideas and suggestions. / Create a formal channel or forum for customers to share ideas and creativity. Then reward them for it to keep the pipeline full! Whether its gamification or simply thanking customers with an inexpensive sampling of free product or discounted service, these efforts go a long way to encourage a customer partnership.

What’s on your qualitative wish list? How can Doyle Research do a better job for you?  We welcome your input! cschmidt@doyleresearch.com

 

Qualitative Design: Utilizing Positive Affect Techniques

Posted on: May 8th, 2017 by doyle

From the desk of Laura Duguid

Positive AffectTraditionally, positive affect techniques have been used in the context of brainstorming sessions, helping to free minds and encourage divergent thinking. Often overlooked however is how inducing positive affect in qualitative design can be beneficial.

Positive affect refers to the extent to which an individual subjectively experiences positive moods such as joy, interest, and alertness. Research shows that by inducing positive affect, one can improve a person’s verbal fluency.1 What’s more, positive affect has been associated with generating increased dopamine levels in the brain, which in turn has been shown to improve cognitive flexibility.2

Practically, inducing positive affect is all about establishing and maintaining an affirming, comfortable environment where respondents feel relaxed and completely free to express their thoughts and opinions. Telling them is not enough. The moderator, the room set-up, and the discussion guide all must contribute. For example:

  • A comfortable, living-room type environment rather than a formal conference table set-up
  • Ease into the discussion more slowly by doing an extra ice breaker, going beyond only respondent introductions
  • Humor! One idea is to find an appropriate yet comical video on YouTube that’s related to the discussion topic as a means of inciting laughter. Humor is one of THE most powerful, efficient ways to induce positive affect.
  • Incorporate movement. Halfway through the group, direct respondents to get up and move around or change seats. This helps literally and figuratively change their perspective, alleviating stale, repetitious responses.
  • Integrate highly engaging, respondent tasks into the discussion guide. Think of creative ways to garner information that require respondents to draw, assemble something, get up and walk to images posted in the room, do brief creative writing exercises, etc.

For research purposes, it’s important to understand that respondents can express negative opinions about a discussion topic without putting a damper on the positive affect. How? Through positive reinforcement from the moderator. Once a respondent has shared information – positive or negative – complimentary encouragement by the moderator (for ALL respondents) is key. In fact, according to Professor Norihiro Sadato, study lead and professor at the National Institute for Physiological Sciences in Japan, “To the brain, receiving a compliment is as much a social reward as being rewarded money. We’ve been able to find scientific proof that a person performs better when they receive a social reward after completing an exercise.”3

While it’s highly unlikely respondents will trade their participation honorarium for compliments, the power of the two together, along with other positive affect influences will certainly assure rich, prolific qualitative results.

 

1 Science Direct, L.H. Philips, R. Bull, E. Adams, L. Fraser, Positive mood and executive function: Evidence from stroop and fluency tasks

2 Psychological Review, 106 (3) (1999), pp. 529-550, A neuropsychological theory of positive affect and its influence on cognition, F.G. Ashby, A.M. Isen, A.U. Turken

3Forbes Online, November 9, 2012, David DiSalvo

Working from Home, Qualitatively

Posted on: September 29th, 2016 by doyle

image1From the desk of Natanya Rubin

It’s 12:30 in the afternoon on a Wednesday, and my assistant project manager and I are wearing matching XXL Kideation tee shirts and borrowed shorts, waiting for our work clothes to come out of the dryer. This is my first day working out of our temporary Doyle Research headquarters in a private residence in the Chicago suburbs, a stop-over as we transition to a co-working space downtown, and I must say, it’s started with a bang, or rather, a downpour.

Our moderators are used to working in all kinds of locations, and under all kinds of conditions. When they’re on the road, a hotel room, focus group facility, coffee shop, classroom, or living room can all serve as a mobile qualitative office. For the field team, the transition from the office to an offsite location has been full of unexpected benefits. Being caught in a thunderstorm during a lunchtime walk and returning to the office soaking wet would normally be an uncomfortable experience, but not if your office comes equipped with a dryer!

Of course, there are challenges to setting up in temporary quarters as well. Our IT department has been working non-stop to make sure we’re all connected to the resources we need to do our jobs wherever we are. Shared spaces create opportunities for collaboration, but also raise the eternal question, Where am I going to take this 90 minute conference call without making my colleagues want to kill me?

Our sojourn at DRA North will be brief, but I’ll miss it when we move into our new, more traditional office space. This time has been a lesson in flexibility, creative problem solving, and, in nice weather, precisely how many feet of firewire cord is needed to take the conference phone out to the back deck.