Posts Tagged ‘project management’

We can see clearly now! Tips and tricks for making the most of your qualitative webcam interview.

Posted on: October 26th, 2017 by doyle

From the desk of Natanya Rubin

Qualitative webcam interviews are an exciting opportunity to see a respondent in her native habitat, but there are plenty of tech pitfalls that can make that time less rewarding.  Here are some of the best practices that we and our platform partners employ to make sure the interview goes well:

The tech check is key.  We always recommend scheduling a live tech check prior to the interview, rather than relying on the respondent to complete an automated one.  This allows a technician to connect personally with the respondent to test bandwidth in the area where the respondent will do the interview, work with them to confirm that their audio functions well, and help them adjust their lighting (see below for more on both topics).

Separate audio and video allows for flexibility, should something go wrong.  Although advances in VOIP stability and clarity make it tempting to have both video and audio run through the respondent’s computer, we recommend that the audio for the qualitative interview be done through the respondent’s phone line.  That way, if the respondent’s internet is spotty and happens to go down during the interview (which sometimes happens despite best efforts to vet bandwidth in advance), the interview can still be salvaged using the separate audio.  During the tech check, we also instruct respondents to make sure their phones are charged and that the power cord is within reach, to ensure that there are no interruptions to the audio.

Lighting is a make or break proposition.  Ensuring good lighting is critical to the success of a qualitative webcam interview.  If the respondent is just a dark, backlit mass, it’s hard to read emotion or see details of their space.  During the tech check, we often help respondents adjust their lighting set-up by asking them to grab a desk or table lamp to get light on their faces, while closing drapes or turning off the lights behind them so they’re not silhouetted.  Then, on the day of the interview, they’re ready to be seen!

By preparing the respondent for the interview through a live tech check, separating audio and video as a safety net against bandwidth issues, and guiding the respondent to be sure they can be seen on-screen, Doyle Research ensures that each qualitative webcam interview is both technically seamless and rich in insights.

 

 

 

 

 

Tackling Tight Timelines, Tough Specs: Is Online Recruiting for Qualitative an Option?

Posted on: June 26th, 2017 by doyle

finger-with-peopleFrom the desk of Natanya Rubin

In a world where the pace of business continues to increase but the demand for actionable, dependable results remains the same, the question in qualitative research becomes, how to deliver?  In the field department, we’re often asked to reconcile a tight timeline with challenging specs, and it’s up to us, with the help of a strong recruiting partner, to accomplish the seemingly impossible.  One option that we sometimes employ is to embrace the online recruit.

Prior to the explosion of online resources, a tough recruit was accomplished mainly by phone.  This was a dependable, but slow, method of finding qualified respondents.  Today, our most common approach to reaching a difficult target quickly is a hybrid of online and telephone recruitment.  Potential respondents are emailed (or even texted!) a preliminary screening survey, containing the study’s foundational specs.  If the respondent qualifies via the survey, they move on to a phone screening to ensure that they truly meet the requirements, and are engaged and articulate.  The online survey saves time and costs, while the telephone screen ensures quality.

Although it’s rare, in the face of a truly compressed timeline we might consider an online only recruit, where respondents complete the entire screener online, and never speak directly with a recruiter.  In that case, embracing the over-recruit is critical to the success of the study.  Although eliminating the hours and manpower that phone screening requires might save some dollars in the budget, an extremely generous over-recruit is needed, sometimes as much as 50% or more.  This ensures enough completes and enough high quality responses to generate reliable findings.  It’s never our preference to recruit this way, but in the face of an urgent need for results, this compromise can deliver.

The challenges of locating hard-to-find respondents are steep enough without adding a compressed timeline to the mix.  But thanks to the possibility of online screening, the chances of success are better than ever.  By deploying a hybrid recruiting method or even an online only method (always being aware of the additional steps needed, in that case, to assure quality completes), a tough timeline can be conquered!

Show Me the Money! Four Factors That Impact Qualitative Research Incentives

Posted on: November 22nd, 2016 by doyle

From the desk of Natanya Rubin

How much should we pay respondents to participate in a qualitative research study?    Answering that question is more of an art than a science.  Incentives provide both motivation for respondents to follow through on their commitment to the research, as well as compensation for their time and effort.moneyvote

While there is a basic formula that recruiters use to estimate respondent incentives, there are four key considerations that influence the recommended amount:

  1. The “time and inconvenience” factor:  Is it a 15-minute telephone interview?  A two-hour focus group at a facility that is a 20-minute drive away?   A series of activities over an extended period?
  2. The difficulty of the recruit:  Does virtually anyone qualify?  Or are we looking for the proverbial needle in a haystack?
  3. The time of day.  Are you asking stay-at-home parents with school aged children to participate in research at 3 PM?    Are you asking full-time professionals to participate in research during business hours?
  4. The market where the research is going to be conducted:  Is the research being conducted in coastal urban markets or in small Midwestern towns or rural markets?

The time and inconvenience factor assumes there is a basic cost to get people “out the door,” whether that involves logging onto a website, dialing into a webcam group or interview, or driving to a facility.  After that the other consideration is whether we are asking for a one-time commitment, or a commitment over time.    A one-time commitment might involve visiting a store to complete a diary exercise; or, driving to a focus group facility for a 90-minute focus group.   A commitment over time might involve asking a respondent to shop and prepare a specific food item, or to keep a diary of their workflow or food consumption for an extended period.  An incentive for an over-time commitment factors in the actual hours it will take for respondents’ to complete the tasks, but it also factors in a dollar amount that will keep them engaged and participating for the days, weeks, or months that are required.

The difficulty of the recruit comes into play when it is necessary to talk to a highly trained or very specific, low incidence target market.   If there are a limited number of possible respondents, when recruiters find them they want incentives to be higher than average so the qualified person is more likely to agree to participate.   In this case, increasing the participation rate reduces the number of recruiting hours needed to successfully complete the project.

Don’t underestimate the importance of time of day when determining incentives.   If you need stay-at-home parents to participate in a group or interview at 3 PM, just when the children are coming home from school, you are going to have to factor in the possibility that they will need to hire a babysitter.   If you are asking full-time professionals to participate in research during business hours, they will need to be compensated enough to make up for missing work.

Finally, the market where the research is going to be conducted can directly impact incentives.  Large urban markets command higher incentives than small town or rural markets where parking is free, and the cost of living is lower.

One other time when incentives are adjusted is in the moment, if weather is expected to impact show rates.   When it’s raining hard, or a snowstorm is expected, people are more likely to cancel.   To make the trip in inclement weather worth their while, we may increase incentives at the last minute, or offer a bonus for people who show up on time.

So when determining incentives, remember that there is not a “one size fits all” answer.   The real answer is “it depends!”