Posts Tagged ‘IIeX’

IIeX 2017: A Qualitative Recap

Posted on: June 21st, 2017 by doyle

iiexgeneral

Once again, I attended what I have come to consider the premiere event for MR’s who are interested in staying abreast of trends, the IIeX Conference in Atlanta.   A combination of excellent presentations as well as a very robust exhibit experience – often with vendors I have not yet seen at another conference – makes it a “must” on my annual conference list.   Here are a few of my takeaways:

  •  There is a sense that the industry has swung too far in our focus on technology at the expense of insights.   It’s not enough to have whiz bang, gee whiz technology unless it is helpful in producing strategic insight.    As one panelist stated, technology should be assisting us in freeing up our intellectual capital, so that only 20% of our time is spent on analysis, and the remaining 80% is on the storytelling.
  • Qualitative seems to be making a comeback, as the antidote to  overwhelming amounts of data that are lacking insight. As a qualitative research consultant, it is both gratifying and a very welcome trend.
  • We have reached the point where there is no longer much meaningful distinction between online research and mobile research. Even when respondents are participating using an online platform, they are highly likely to be accessing it on their smartphone.   Essentially, we have moved into an era where research has become “device agnostic”.  I heretofore resolve to refer to Doyle Research’s online and mobile capabilities as our “digital” methods.
  • The panel and recruitment segment of our industry is struggling with the fact that screeners and surveys are becoming longer and longer, sharply increasing the cost to complete a study. Some vendors are considering charging for Q’s above a certain number; others are taking the approach of refusing to accept more than a certain number of questions.   Clearly, as researchers and clients, we must question the need to ask so many questions.   Do we really think the quality of the insights is going to be improved by surveying respondents who are impatient and fatigued?
  • One thing I heard that disturbed me: some clients reported that they receive deliverables from their MR partners that they need to rewrite before issuing them.   In some cases, they have defaulted to asking only for the raw data and writing it from scratch themselves.   We cannot let that happen!   Our long-term value—the value that cannot be replaced by technology — lies in our ability to deliver insights, as well as the strategies for acting upon those insights, in a clear and compelling manner; and to engage our clients in co-creating solutions.

Once again, I left IIeX exhausted (did I mention that it took 15 hours to fly home from Atlanta to Chicago?) but inspired.    Keep up the good work Lenny and crew!   I’ll see you next year.

Can Market Research Be Delivered Cheaper, Faster AND Better?

Posted on: June 28th, 2016 by doyle

From the desk of Kathy Doyle

I had the pleasure of attending IIeX North America in Atlanta June 13-15.   It has become a “go to” market research conference for me, always providing a window into the future of our industry, from bothgoodfastcheap1 the client’s and research partner’s perspective.

This year, what I heard over and over was that clients expect their research partners to provide results cheaper, faster AND better.     For years, standard wisdom has been that clients could expect two of three, but never all three.   If you wanted the research to be better, you would have to sacrifice either cost or speed.   That is about to change.

Taking a peek into the (not so distant) future, the market research industry is beginning to embrace automation.   It is now possible to get machine translation of a multitude of languages almost instantly, and a human translation within 24 hours.   Audio and video clips can be instantly transcribed, allowing researchers to quickly search for and clip highlights to incorporate into a final deliverable. Text analytics is getting so robust that I actually heard clients say, in effect, “ if a machine can write the report, let it.   I am hiring you for study design, and for finding the insights and translating them into a story that helps us make decisions.”

DIY recruiting, DIY mobile surveys, automated incentive payments… exhibitors offering each of these was present at the conference, and their offerings were impressive.

So, while I still believe you get what you pay for, it is in our best interests as research partners to automate any activities that are repetitive, and that hinder us from being thinkers vs. doers.

IIeX Recap: Jack Be Nimble, Jack Be Quick

Posted on: June 17th, 2015 by doyle

alice at conferenceFrom the desk of Alice Morgan

IIeX, has become the go-to conference about innovation in the market research space. It’s fantastic, a crash course in the new and now.

Main takeways:

  • Quant surveys need to be short, easy, fast and fun.
  • Play nice with big data. IT is your friend.
  • Mobile ethnography generates rich, lively, in-the-moment insights in today’s selfie society.
  • Indirect, out-of-the-box qualitative methods such as empathy and improvisation yield great stuff.

During the IIeX Innovation Competition, startups vied for a cash prize. Fetch has a cool grocery shopping app that enables you to apply discounts, keep a running tally of what you’re spending, and express checkout.   Dataga.me reduces survey fatigue by turning surveys into games. Sway conducts surveys within various gaming apps and provides results lickety-split.   Other platforms to watch out for include Digsite, an online qualitative community with the look and feel of social media. And Ditto uses complex mathematical models to code and analyze photos, identifying patterns and brand associations in the process.

Google (aka the elephant in the room) gave a reassuring presentation about how despite – or perhaps because of – Big Data, there will still be a need for surveys. The audience breathed a collective sigh of relief!

I presented “Kicking the Tires: the Automotive Path to Purchase” which analyzed new car-buyers’ experiences at the dealership and showcased Doyle’s cutting-edge mobile technique Geo-Stories℠. We appreciated the opportunity to present.

Many thanks to Leonard Murphy and the Greenbook team for planning and hosting such an outstanding learning opportunity.