Archive for February, 2018



Recruiting Online Qualitative: Best Practices from the Trenches

Posted on: February 20th, 2018 by doyle No Comments

From the desk of Natanya Rubin

Online qualitative research is a terrific way to accomplish a national or even international recruit, save time and money on travel, and to gain deep insights from respondents.  But the success of a project can only be assured by getting the details of the recruit right.  We’d like to share some best practices that help ensure that your online project delivers!

Understand your recruiting target.  When you’re deciding whether to conduct mobile diaries, online communities, or webcam interviews, take a good look at your respondent profile and ask yourself, “What is the right method for this target? For example, you might find that with a youth-oriented recruit, you will get richer insights from a mobile journal, where respondents can speak intimately and in their own voice, versus a traditional online bulletin board where they may not have the patience to provide in-depth, written responses.

Be prepared to offer an appropriate incentive. Make sure your incentive is appropriate to the investment of time and effort you’re asking of the respondent, to reduce drop-off during the study and the need for more over-recruits.  Online qual often asks respondents to return to the platform on multiple occasions, since tracking behavior over time is one of the many benefits of the methodology.  The incentive must entice (as well as fairly reward) the respondents in order to get good completion rates.

Screen smart. Screeners for online qual should always include questions around technology ownership and user comfort with their devices, along with questions about online behaviors that ensure that they will be able to navigate the chosen platform. Additionally, we select recruiters who use recruiting methods that meet respondents on their own turf.  For example, a mobile pre-screening link is a natural method of outreach for respondents who spend a great deal of time on their smartphones, and who might be great candidates for a mobile journal.

Choose the right recruiter.  It’s important to select a recruiter with a substantial qualitative database for online methodologies.  Although there are some studies where a panel recruit might be appropriate, it is not recommended for online qual, as respondents who are more used to online surveys might not understand the robust commitment expected for an online qualitative study.

By taking a good look at your target, offering the right incentive, asking the right questions in the screener, and choosing a recruiting partner who can deliver committed respondents, you can ensure that your online study delivers rich, in-the-moment insights!

 

Change is the New Normal: Insights from the 2018 QRCA Conference

Posted on: February 2nd, 2018 by doyle

From the desk of Kathy Doyle

IF you are a qualitative researcher and have not attended a QRCA Conference, you owe it to yourself to add it to your list.  QRCA members are hands down the most generous, forward-thinking and collegial people you will ever meet, and the conference itself is unlike any other.

As usual, this year’s conference was full of educational and inspirational sessions, great exhibitors, and some excellent and thought-provoking roundtable discussions.

Here is a recap of my key takeaways:

  1. Social media and AI technology are rapidly becoming the next generation tool for qualitative recruiting and data collection. Shapiro & Raj discussed their social adaptive recruiting, which accesses forums, online communities, and public social networks to “find the hard-to-find”; and Tory Gentes discussed some decidedly non-traditional techniques for using tools in our socially connected world (some sites this Boomer had never heard of before!) as a means to find quality recruits.
  2. Virtual Reality (VR) and Augmented Reality (AR) are poised to explode as a qualitative tool. David Bauer, of Hemisphere Insights, led a great session on this topic.  As home VR equipment becomes ubiquitous, and programming costs are reduced, the ability to create more engaging experiences will become a reality.    Use VR/AR to test concepts in-home; to simulate an in-store shopping experience; to create truly engaging virtual ethnography; to facilitate co-creation; and to allow stakeholders to understand the customer experience in a way not possible before.
  3. The traditional qualitative report is slowly but surely going the way of the dinosaur. The momentum continues to grow for shorter, more visual,  non-traditional reports that tell a story that can persuade and influence decision making.  While PPT is still most common, reports may also take the form of podcasts, photo books, full video reports, magazine reports, talk shows, or any number of other creative deliverables.
  4. The line between qualitative and quantitative is continuing to blur. Any survey can now be combined with qualitative feedback via video open-ends or qualitative “pull outs” –where a select number of respondents (based on their survey responses) are asked to participate in follow up qualitative interviews, to expand upon the learning from the survey and address the “why’s” behind their responses.  Where once qualitative and quantitative were distinctly different beasts, hybrid projects are becoming increasingly common.

It’s an exciting time to be in the market research industry.   Hold on, and enjoy the ride!

“This is a new year. A new beginning. And things will change.” 
― Taylor Swift

“The pace of change and the threat of disruption creates tremendous opportunities…” 
Steve Case